Museum of the Moving Image

35th Avenue at 37th Street

The American Museum of the Moving Image is dedicated to educating the public about the art, history, technique, and technology of film, television, and digital media, and to examining their impact on culture and society. It achieves these goals by ma... more

The American Museum of the Moving Image is dedicated to educating the public about the art, history, technique, and technology of film, television, and digital media, and to examining their impact on culture and society. It achieves these goals by maintaining the nation's largest permanent collection of moving image artifacts, and by offering the public exhibitions, film screenings, lectures, seminars, and other education programs. The Museum is located on the site of what was once the largest, busiest, and most significant motion picture and television production facility between London and Hollywood, the famous Astoria Studio. Built in 1920 across the East River from midtown Manhattan, the studio was Paramount's East Coast production facility, and, in the 1930s, a site for independent film production. In 1942 the U.S. Army bought the Astoria Studio and renamed it the Signal Corps Photographic Center. The studio filled a major need for expanded productionapability to speed the training of millions of wartime inductees. After the Army left in 1971, the site fell into disrepair until the Museum took shape in the eighties. The museum has assembled the nation's largest an... more

The American Museum of the Moving Image is dedicated to educating the public about the art, history, technique, and technology of film, television, and digital media, and to examining their impact on culture and society. It achieves these goals by maintaining the nation's largest permanent collection of moving image artifacts, and by offering the public exhibitions, film screenings, lectures, seminars, and other education programs.

The Museum is located on the site of what was once the largest, busiest, and most significant motion picture and television production facility between London and Hollywood, the famous Astoria Studio. Built in 1920 across the East River from midtown Manhattan, the studio was Paramount's East Coast production facility, and, in the 1930s, a site for independent film production. In 1942 the U.S. Army bought the Astoria Studio and renamed it the Signal Corps Photographic Center. The studio filled a major need for expanded productionapability to speed the training of millions of wartime inductees. After the Army left in 1971, the site fell into disrepair until the Museum took shape in the eighties.

The museum has assembled the nation's largest and most comprehensive holdings of moving image artifacts, which is one of the most important collections of its kind in the world, numbering more than 83,000 items. For example, the collection includes: photographed studies of locomotion made by Eadweard Muybridge in 1887; an early mechanical television created in 1931 by C. Francis Jenkins; the chariot driven by Charlton Heston in the epic film BEN HUR (1959); Computer Space, the first coin-operated video arcade game released by Nolan Bushnell in 1971; a character puppet of Yoda, created by Stuart Freeborn for THE EMPIRE STRIKES BACK (1980); and TUT'S FEVER (1986-88), an installation artwork by Red Grooms and Lysiane Luong.


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Astoria Description

Museum of the Moving Image is located in the Astoria neighborhood of Manhattan. Astoria is the western-most neighborhood in Queens, running from the East River west to Northern Boulevard and 49th Street, and from Ditmars Boulevard south to Queens Plaza. It is just north of Long Island City, of which Astoria once was and is sometimes still considered to be a part, and is bounded on the north by Steinway and by Woodside on the east.

Nestled in one of the most suburban boroughs, Astoria peeks across the East River at Manhattan from its squat houses and commercial buildings. Largely residential, the neighborhood has gone through the usual waves of immigrants over the course of the centuries; first, the Germans, then the Italians and Jews, a massive and significant influx of Greeks, and most recently, Middle Eastern, African, and Eastern Europeans have made Astoria their new home. For a neighborhood that takes its name from John Jacob Astor—once the richest man in America—it remains remarkably middle-class, with a strong sense of community and ethnic heritage, making it a very tight-knit neighborhood.

There are, of course, many great ethnic restaurants of all stripes in Astoria, from favorites like Uncle George's Greek Tavern, Il Bambino, and the Bohemian Beer Hall & Garden to Malagueta, Mojave, and The Queens Kickshaw. For drinking, there's the Quays Pub, cocktails at Sweet Afton, and The Barn. For attractions, there's the wonder Noguchi Garden Museum, showcasing the amazing work of the famed sculptor, even more artistic action at Socrates Sculpture Park, and the Museum Of The Moving Image.

There are no events taking place on this date.

Info

35th Avenue at 37th Street
Queens, NY 11106
(718) 784-4520
Website

Editorial Rating

Admission And Tickets

Suggested Donation
$15 - Adults
$11 - Seniors & students
$9 - Children (3-13)
Members & Children under 3: Free

This Week's Hours

Wed-Thu: 10:30am-5:00pm
Fri: 10:30am-8:00pm (Free admission 4-8pm)
Sat-Sun: 11:30am-7:00pm

Nearby Subway

  • to Steinway

Upcoming Events

Moving Image Collection

The Museum maintains the nation's largest and most comprehensive collection of artifacts relating to the art, history, and technology of the moving image—one of the most important collections of its kind in the world. Begun at the Museum's inception in 1981, today the collection numbers approximatel... [ + ]y 125,000 artifacts.

This rich and extensive collection is an invaluable resource for both the general public and for scholars, benefiting anyone who takes an interest in the history and culture of the moving image. Artifacts include: technical apparatus, still photographs, licensed merchandise, design materials, costumes, fan magazines, publicity materials of all kinds, video and computer games, and historical movie theater furnishings. Over 1,200 of these objects are currently on display in the Museum's core exhibition, Behind the Screen.

The collection is constantly growing as collectors, studios, manufacturers, and industry workers donate new artifacts. The Museum loans objects from its collection to other cultural institutions, and images of artifacts in the collection have been used in textbooks, films, and for a wide range of research projects.

The Internet and advances in digital technology have allowed the Museum to reach a significant new audience. Grants from the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) and the New York State Council on the Arts (NYSCA) have supported the Museum's online collection catalog.

03/20/2019 10:00 AM
Wed, March 20
10:00AM
$
Suggested Donation
$15 - Adults
$11 - Seniors & students
$9 - Children (3-13)
Members & Children under 3: Free

Behind the Screen

Behind the Screen illuminates the many processes involved in producing, marketing, and exhibiting the moving image, with more than a thousand film and television artifacts, computer-based interactive experiences, commissioned installations, audio-visual materials, and demonstrations of professional ... [ + ]equipment and techniques.

Fourteen classic video games in their original arcade versions, are now on display and playable in Behind the Screen, in the section "Interacting with the Screen." Four game tokens are available for a dollar. Also, there are daily talks by educators about early video game technology.

03/20/2019 10:00 AM
Wed, March 20
10:00AM
$
Suggested Donation
$15 - Adults
$11 - Seniors & students
$9 - Children (3-13)
Members & Children under 3: Free

Moving Image Collection

The Museum maintains the nation's largest and most comprehensive collection of artifacts relating to the art, history, and technology of the moving image—one of the most important collections of its kind in the world. Begun at the Museum's inception in 1981, today the collection numbers approximatel... [ + ]y 125,000 artifacts.

This rich and extensive collection is an invaluable resource for both the general public and for scholars, benefiting anyone who takes an interest in the history and culture of the moving image. Artifacts include: technical apparatus, still photographs, licensed merchandise, design materials, costumes, fan magazines, publicity materials of all kinds, video and computer games, and historical movie theater furnishings. Over 1,200 of these objects are currently on display in the Museum's core exhibition, Behind the Screen.

The collection is constantly growing as collectors, studios, manufacturers, and industry workers donate new artifacts. The Museum loans objects from its collection to other cultural institutions, and images of artifacts in the collection have been used in textbooks, films, and for a wide range of research projects.

The Internet and advances in digital technology have allowed the Museum to reach a significant new audience. Grants from the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) and the New York State Council on the Arts (NYSCA) have supported the Museum's online collection catalog.

03/21/2019 10:00 AM
Thu, March 21
10:00AM
$
Suggested Donation
$15 - Adults
$11 - Seniors & students
$9 - Children (3-13)
Members & Children under 3: Free

Behind the Screen

Behind the Screen illuminates the many processes involved in producing, marketing, and exhibiting the moving image, with more than a thousand film and television artifacts, computer-based interactive experiences, commissioned installations, audio-visual materials, and demonstrations of professional ... [ + ]equipment and techniques.

Fourteen classic video games in their original arcade versions, are now on display and playable in Behind the Screen, in the section "Interacting with the Screen." Four game tokens are available for a dollar. Also, there are daily talks by educators about early video game technology.

03/21/2019 10:00 AM
Thu, March 21
10:00AM
$
Suggested Donation
$15 - Adults
$11 - Seniors & students
$9 - Children (3-13)
Members & Children under 3: Free
View All Upcoming Events

@movingimagenyc

Alex Gibney's new documentary THE INVENTOR: OUT FOR BLOOD IN SILICON VALLEY premieres tonight on @HBO…
https://t.co/Vk53KOF4M7 22 Hours Ago

QWFF opens this Thursday! Find the full schedule at
https://t.co/TQ6togRJqI
https://t.co/onSMWgj1gg 23 Hours Ago

One of Mike Leigh's most ambitious works, PETERLOO dives deep into the past to tell a story that unmistakably reson…
https://t.co/zqN19LTo6j Yesterday at 5:04 PM

Next: MoMI Curator-at-Large David Schwartz, a @QueensWorldFilm #SpiritofQueens honoree, introduces the trailer for…
https://t.co/Y2rUaUMbWs Yesterday at 3:30 PM

view all

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