Frick Collection

1 East 70th Street

A visit to The Frick Collection evokes the splendor and tranquillity of a time gone by and at the same time testifies to how great art collections can still inspire viewers today. Housed in the New York mansion built by Henry Clay Frick, one of Ameri... more

A visit to The Frick Collection evokes the splendor and tranquillity of a time gone by and at the same time testifies to how great art collections can still inspire viewers today. Housed in the New York mansion built by Henry Clay Frick, one of America’s most successful steel and railroad tycoons, are masterpieces of Western painting, sculpture, and decorative art, displayed in a serene and intimate setting. Each of sixteen galleries offers a unique presentation of works of art arranged for the most part without regard to period or national origin, in the same spirit as Mr. Frick enjoyed the art he loved before he bequeathed it to the public. Both the mansion and the works in it serve as a monument to one of America's greatest art collectors. Built in 1913–14 from designs by the firm Carrère and Hastings, the house is set back from Fifth Avenue by an elevated garden punctuated by three magnificent magnolia trees. Since Mr. Frick’s death in 1919, the Collection has expanded both its physical dimensions and its holdings. Approximately one third of the pictures have been acquired since then, and twice — in 1931–35 and 1977 — the building has been enlarged to better serve the pub... more

A visit to The Frick Collection evokes the splendor and tranquillity of a time gone by and at the same time testifies to how great art collections can still inspire viewers today. Housed in the New York mansion built by Henry Clay Frick, one of America’s most successful steel and railroad tycoons, are masterpieces of Western painting, sculpture, and decorative art, displayed in a serene and intimate setting. Each of sixteen galleries offers a unique presentation of works of art arranged for the most part without regard to period or national origin, in the same spirit as Mr. Frick enjoyed the art he loved before he bequeathed it to the public.

Both the mansion and the works in it serve as a monument to one of America's greatest art collectors. Built in 1913–14 from designs by the firm Carrère and Hastings, the house is set back from Fifth Avenue by an elevated garden punctuated by three magnificent magnolia trees.

Since Mr. Frick’s death in 1919, the Collection has expanded both its physical dimensions and its holdings. Approximately one third of the pictures have been acquired since then, and twice — in 1931–35 and 1977 — the building has been enlarged to better serve the public. At the Frick, visitors stroll from the airy, lighthearted Fragonard Room, named for that artist's large wall paintings of The Progress of Love and furnished with exceptional eighteenth-century French furniture and Sèvres porcelain, to the more austere atmosphere of the Living Hall, filled with masterpieces by Holbein, Titian, El Greco, and Bellini. Passing through the Library, rich with Italian bronzes and Chinese porcelain vases, one arrives at Mr. Frick’s long West Gallery, hung with celebrated canvases including landscapes by Constable, Ruisdael, and Corot and portraits by Rembrandt and Velázquez. Vermeer's Mistress and Maid, the last painting Mr. Frick bought, is one of three pictures by that artist in the Collection, while Piero della Francesca's image of St. John the Evangelist, dominating the Enamel Room, is the only large painting by Piero in the United States. The East Gallery, adorned with works by Degas, Goya, Turner, Van Dyck, Claude Lorrain, Whistler, and others, usually concludes a visit to the galleries and leads visitors to the serene space of the Garden Court, where they pause beneath the skylight, surrounded by greenery and the gentle sounds of the fountain.

Note:Children under ten are not admitted to the Collection, and those under sixteen must be accompanied by an adult.


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Upper East Side Description

Frick Collection is located in the Upper East Side neighborhood of Manhattan. How best to describe one of the most famous neighborhoods in the United States? Aside from the extreme concentration of the rich and the famous, their opulent dwellings, and the army of doormen, butlers and chauffeurs who serve them, the Upper East Side is also a showcase for some of America’s finest cultural establishments.

Walk along Fifth Avenue’s Museum Mile which features a veritable plethora of artistic and cultural institutions. For some of the best contemporary art collections, visit the Cooper Hewitt Design Museum and the recently renovated cylindrical wonder that is the Guggenheim. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, the Guggenheim has always prided itself on being home to innovative and at times controversial works of art since its inception in 1959. There’s also the Jewish Museum, one of the world's largest and most important institutions devoted to exploring the remarkable scope and diversity of Jewish culture.

Of course, no visit to Museum Mile would be complete without to the city’s crown jewel, the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Many special exhibits complement the permanent displays at the Met, yet the collection is so vast that the huge storage areas under Central Park are bursting with pictures, sculptures and other objects d’art. From rare, ancient Egyptian relics to medieval coats of armor to a costume gallery that spans seven centuries it’s almost impossible to see everything in one visit, so multiple trips may be necessary. In addition, visit the nearby Whitney Museum of American Art and see thousands of works of art including collections by seminal artists such as Edward Hopper, Alexander Calder and Reginald Marsh. The Asia Society Museum, and Frick Collection are also nearby.

The official residence of New York City’s mayor, Gracie Mansion, is at the northern end of Carl Schurz Park on 89th Street. The main floor of the mansion is open to the public and is a showcase for art and antiques created by New York designers, cabinetmakers, painters and sculptors. Tours must be reserved in advance however.

From glamorous Fifth and Park Avenues to the fashionable townhouses in the East Sixties, Seventies and Eighties, there are too many noteworthy addresses to list, but a veritable Who’s Who of American society can be found here and if you’re lucky, you might even get a glimpse of it. For your best bet, try dinner at Elaine’s. While the food is essentially secondary to the patronage, it remains a great spot for celeb-spotting. Named after its famed, cantankerous owner who can still be spotted their nearly every night attending to customers, the casual bistro is a frequented by a high celebrity clientele and counts Woody Allen, Michael Caine and Jackie Onassis among its devotees. Good luck getting a reservation. If it's fresh seafood you're craving try Atlantic Grill. Sample the daily selection of oysters and clams on the half shell from the raw bar. Or try their unique take on sushi and sashimi. Restaurant Daniel is another great dining option renowned for its award-winning French cuisine and elegant atmosphere.

The Upper East Side is also home to some of the most luxurious hotels in New York. There's the classic Carlyle, which has been called home by leaders in world affairs, business, society, entertainment and the arts since its debut in 1930. The Carlyle remains a landmark of elegance and refined taste. Other prestigious hotels in the area include The Mark, which has been cited as one of the top 100 U.S. and Canada hotels in a Travel + Leisure's readers' poll and the sophisticated Lowell. A bit further south at the southeastern corner of Central Park, of course there's the most legendary hotel of them all, The Plaza, which set the standard for luxury when it opened over a century ago. The tradition continues following a recently completed $400 million, two-year renovation. The passion and uncompromising service, which made the hotel a legend, has returned with a new and contemporary spirit.

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Info

1 East 70th Street
New York, NY 10021
(212) 288-0700
Website

Editorial Rating

Admission And Tickets

$22 - Adults
$17 - Seniors (62 and over)
$12 - Students with ID

First Friday every month admission is free.

Sundays pay as you wish 11:00am-1:00pm
Members always free

The price of admission includes the ArtPhone audio guide.

This Week's Hours

Tue-Sat: 10:00am-6:00pm
Sun: 11:00am-5:00pm

Wed: Pay what you wish 2 p.m. to 6 p.m.

Nearby Subway

  • to 68th St/Hunter College -- 0.3

Upcoming Events

Painting - The Frick Collection

Chief among the bequests of Henry Clay Frick (1849-1919), which also included sculpture, drawings, prints, furniture, porcelains, enamels, rugs, and silver, were one hundred thirty-one paintings. More than forty additional paintings have been added to the Collection over the years. After initially ... [ + ]concentrating on Salon pictures and works by the Barbizon school, he purchased his first old masters around the turn of the century. In the next decade he acquired many of the distinguished paintings that established the character of the Collection as it is seen today.

12/20/2018 10:00 AM
Thu, December 20
10:00AM
$
$22 - Adults
$17 - Seniors (62 and over)
$12 - Students with ID

First Friday every month admission is free.

Sundays pay as you wish 11:00am-1:00pm
Members always free

The price of admission includes the ArtPhone audio guide.

Sculpture - The Frick Collection

Most of the sculpture purchased by Mr. Frick for the Collection was from the Italian Renaissance. Notable in the Collection are works by Vecchietta, Laurana, Francesco da Sangallo, Antonio Pollaiuolo, Riccio, and Severo da Ravenna. Frick's earliest purchases of French sculpture seem to have been ch... [ + ]osen to fit in with the decorative schemes of the house. Evidently the first sculpture he bought, in 1914, was the Lemoyne Garden Vase for the interior courtyard; later he obtained remarkable works by Coysevox, Houdon, and Clodion. A number of splendid early North European sculptures are also in the Collection, above all the bust of the Duke of Alba by Jonghelinck, the Multscher reliquary bust, and bronzes traditionally ascribed to Adriaen de Vries and Hubert Gerhard.

12/20/2018 10:00 AM
Thu, December 20
10:00AM
$
$22 - Adults
$17 - Seniors (62 and over)
$12 - Students with ID

First Friday every month admission is free.

Sundays pay as you wish 11:00am-1:00pm
Members always free

The price of admission includes the ArtPhone audio guide.

Furniture - The Frick Collection

The range of furniture in The Frick Collection is not atypical of a grand New York residence at the beginning of the twentieth century; a comparable variety of periods and places of origin could be found among the furniture in the Morgan house and library. Brought together were Renaissance examples,... [ + ] French works of the late seventeenth and the eighteenth centuries, some English pieces in the Library and Dining Room and in the bedrooms, and furniture especially designed and made for the house by the architect or interior designer.

12/20/2018 10:00 AM
Thu, December 20
10:00AM
$
$22 - Adults
$17 - Seniors (62 and over)
$12 - Students with ID

First Friday every month admission is free.

Sundays pay as you wish 11:00am-1:00pm
Members always free

The price of admission includes the ArtPhone audio guide.

Porcelain - The Frick Collection

The Oriental Porcelains in The Frick Collection date from the Ming and Ch'ing dynasties and embrace a range of types including blue and white, famille verte, famille noire, and famille rose. The French pieces include remarkable examples of Vincennes and Sèvres soft-past porcelains of the eighteenth ... [ + ]century, as well as a rare sixteenth century ewer of Saint-Porchaire earthenware.

12/20/2018 10:00 AM
Thu, December 20
10:00AM
$
$22 - Adults
$17 - Seniors (62 and over)
$12 - Students with ID

First Friday every month admission is free.

Sundays pay as you wish 11:00am-1:00pm
Members always free

The price of admission includes the ArtPhone audio guide.
View All Upcoming Events

@frickcollection

Right now (noonish 12/13) we're hosting a fun "Librarian's Choice" Facebook LIVE about holiday cards in our collect…
https://t.co/TL4j6fgApt Thu at 5:12 PM

RT @sargentology: Did #Sargent cause the downfall of the Agnews?This portrait made Lady Agnew so famous that they couldn't keep up with the… Thu at 1:51 PM

@sargentology @NtlMuseumsScot Great post. As publicist for @frickcollection it pains me to not see this painting ev…
https://t.co/p1ycGpsd9B Thu at 1:51 PM

RT @SelldorfArch: The Frick is also Annabelle's favorite place in NYC🙌! Thrilled to see @frickcollection highlighted among some of the citi… Wed at 7:54 PM

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