7 World Trade Center

250 Greenwich St.

The new 7 World Trade Center opened in May 2006, and has 52 stories, is 741 feet tall, and has been touted as the safest skyscraper in the world. The elevators have two feet of reinforced concrete and are fireproofed, while the stairways are wider an... more

The new 7 World Trade Center opened in May 2006, and has 52 stories, is 741 feet tall, and has been touted as the safest skyscraper in the world. The elevators have two feet of reinforced concrete and are fireproofed, while the stairways are wider and the steel columns are thickly fire-proofed as well. The original 7 World Trade Center opened in 1987, but was damaged by debris and destroyed by fire following the September 11th attacks. The building’s reopening was marked by a free concert featuring Lou Reed, Suzanne Vega, and Citizen Cope among other New York-based artists. The building’s upper floors have since hosted various charity functions, fashion shows and other black-tie galas in order to bring attention to the revitalization of lower Manhattan. In addition to its high profile security features, the building’s exterior is aesthetically pleasing as well. David Childs along with Glass artist James Carpenter created a glossy stainless-steel and low iron glass design which reflects sunlight. Additionally, the base of the building has a curtain wall made of stainless steel louvers which also reflects light during the day, while at night it is illuminated with blue LED ... more

The new 7 World Trade Center opened in May 2006, and has 52 stories, is 741 feet tall, and has been touted as the safest skyscraper in the world. The elevators have two feet of reinforced concrete and are fireproofed, while the stairways are wider and the steel columns are thickly fire-proofed as well.

The original 7 World Trade Center opened in 1987, but was damaged by debris and destroyed by fire following the September 11th attacks. The building’s reopening was marked by a free concert featuring Lou Reed, Suzanne Vega, and Citizen Cope among other New York-based artists. The building’s upper floors have since hosted various charity functions, fashion shows and other black-tie galas in order to bring attention to the revitalization of lower Manhattan.

In addition to its high profile security features, the building’s exterior is aesthetically pleasing as well. David Childs along with Glass artist James Carpenter created a glossy stainless-steel and low iron glass design which reflects sunlight. Additionally, the base of the building has a curtain wall made of stainless steel louvers which also reflects light during the day, while at night it is illuminated with blue LED lights. A large cube of light above the lobby also shines a white light during the day and emanates blue at night. At dusk you can watch it colorfully transition from violet to black to blue. The lobby itself contains a large light installation which features glowing text from selected poems moving across plastic panels. The installation spans 65 feet wide and 14 feet tall.

The building has also been certified New York’s first “Green” office tower. Nearly 30 percent of the structural steel used in the building consists of recycled material. Additionally rain water is collected and used to irrigate the park, as well as cool the building. Heating steam is even reused to generate some of the building’s power, which is metered in order to encourage tenants to conserve energy.


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Financial District Description

7 World Trade Center is located in the Financial District neighborhood of Manhattan. The financial hub of the United States, the seat of New York City government, and home to some of New York's oldest buildings, the Financial District has an illustrious history. 17th century settlers began building here, and given the many seafarers of the time, boats could be conveniently docked at one of the slips right near the settlements of wooden homes. Right nearby, in the heart of the district is Federal Hall, where George Washington was inaugurated as the first President of the United States in 1789, also the meeting site for the First Congress. New York City was both the capital of the United States and New York State at the time.

The street names reflect the district's fascinating history: Fulton Street, named after Robert Fulton, the inventor of the steamboat; Maiden Lane, originally called Magde Platje in Dutch; Beaver Street, recalling the once-significant beaver pelt trade, etc.

The area today houses some great economic powerhouses, including the headquarters of major banks, the New York Stock Exchange, in addition to the World Financial Center. Contrasts are extraordinary, from old two- and three-story old brick buildings near South Street Seaport to the nearby modern mega-skyscrapers. Some of the numerous other attractions include Fraunces Tavern, where George Washington bid farewell to his troops (also, they have a museum!); the newly-landscaped City Hall Park; the Museum of the American Indian and the US Custom House at Bowling Green; Trinity Church, the first parish church in New York City and the resting place of Alexander Hamilton and Robert Fulton, among others; War Of 1812 strong hold Castle Clinton; the Staten Island-bound South Ferry; Battery Park; and the Federal Reserve Bank. Sadly, the biggest attraction since 9/11 has been the former World Trade Center site, although, thankfully, construction has finally filled the long-standing gouge in Lower Manhattan's face, and the stunning 9/11 Memorial and its attendant museum are welcome signs of a healing city. And, of course, soaring a symbolic 1,776 feet over the memorial is the new 1 World Trade Center!

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Info

250 Greenwich St.
New York, NY 10007
(212) 551-7355
Website

Editorial Rating

Nearby Subway

  • to Fulton Street
  • to World Trade Center
  • to Cortlandt Street
  • to Rector Street

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