Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum

1071 Fifth Avenue

The Guggenheim holds a unique place in the history of New York City's museums. Established some sixty years ago by philanthropist Solomon R. Guggenheim and artist-advisor Hilla Rebay, it first assumed temporary residence in a former automobile showro... more

The Guggenheim holds a unique place in the history of New York City's museums. Established some sixty years ago by philanthropist Solomon R. Guggenheim and artist-advisor Hilla Rebay, it first assumed temporary residence in a former automobile showroom on East 54th Street in New York. The "Museum of Non-Objective Painting," as it was then known, took as its basis the radical new forms of art being developed by such artists as Vasily Kandinsky, Paul Klee, and Piet Mondrian. The insistence of its founders on a wholly new kind of art seen in a wholly new kind of space set the Guggenheim on its path. Throughout its history, it has stood as a groundbreaking institution geared as much toward the promise of the future as the preservation of the past. The belief in preservation was furthered by a recent extensive restoration of the museum’s exterior, which as of 2008 is now nearly complete. The innovative cylindrical building designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, has suffered cracks in its concrete surface since the museum opened in 1959. In 2005, twelve layers of paint were removed in order to repair and restore the building’s unique structure. The museum remained open throughout the proces... more

The Guggenheim holds a unique place in the history of New York City's museums. Established some sixty years ago by philanthropist Solomon R. Guggenheim and artist-advisor Hilla Rebay, it first assumed temporary residence in a former automobile showroom on East 54th Street in New York. The "Museum of Non-Objective Painting," as it was then known, took as its basis the radical new forms of art being developed by such artists as Vasily Kandinsky, Paul Klee, and Piet Mondrian. The insistence of its founders on a wholly new kind of art seen in a wholly new kind of space set the Guggenheim on its path.

Throughout its history, it has stood as a groundbreaking institution geared as much toward the promise of the future as the preservation of the past. The belief in preservation was furthered by a recent extensive restoration of the museum’s exterior, which as of 2008 is now nearly complete. The innovative cylindrical building designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, has suffered cracks in its concrete surface since the museum opened in 1959. In 2005, twelve layers of paint were removed in order to repair and restore the building’s unique structure. The museum remained open throughout the process as visitors passed under scaffolding to enter the building.

The first permanent home for the museum, as mentioned, was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright. He envisioned a building that not only broke the rectilinear grid of Manhattan but also shattered existing notions of what a museum could be. He conceived of its curving, continuous space as a "temple of spirit" where viewers could foster a new way of looking. Named the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in honor of its founder, the building opened in 1959, drawing huge crowds and stirring considerable controversy. It has never lost its power to excite and provoke, standing today as one of the great works of architecture produced in the twentieth century.

The museum entered a new era after the naming of Richard Armstrong as director of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation in late 2008. As director, Mr. Armstrong has a pivotal role in overseeing all aspects of the museums including acquisitions, development, conservation and scholarship.

While the Guggenheim Museum in New York is the Foundation’s flagship museum, there are also several other global branches of the Guggenheim network which include The Peggy Guggenheim Collection in Venice, The Guggenheim Museum Bilbao in Spain and The Deutsche Guggenheim in Berlin. The Guggenheim Abu Dhabi Museum is scheduled to open in 2013.


Drag the street view to look around 360°.
Use the arrow buttons to navigate down the street and around the neighborhood!

There are no events taking place on this date.

Info

1071 Fifth Avenue
New York, NY 10128
(212) 423-3500
Website

Editorial Rating

Admission And Tickets

$25 - Adults
$18 - Seniors, Students
Children under 12: Free
Members: Free

This Week's Hours

Mon: 10:00am–5:30pm
Tue: 10:00am–8:00pm
Wed: 10:00am–5:30pm
Thu: 10:00am–5:30pm
Fri: 10:00am–5:30pm
Sat: 10:00am–8:00pm
Sun: 10:00am–5:30pm

Closed May 23, November 14. Thanksgiving, Christmas Day.

Nearby Subway

  • to 86th St

Upcoming Events

Guggenheim presents ATC: The Secret Life of Bees

Works & Process at the Guggenheim
presents
Atlantic Theater Company:
The Secret Life of Bees
by Susan Birkenhead, Lynn Nottage, and Duncan Sheik, with Sam Gold
Monday, April 22, 2019 at 7:30pm

Set in South Carolina in 1964, Sue Monk Kidd's best-selling novel, The Secret Life of Bees, center... [ + ]s on Lily Owens, a restless white teenager who struggles with her merciless father and the haunting memory of her mother's death. When Rosaleen, her black caregiver, is beaten and jailed for asserting her right to vote, Lily's rebellious spirit is ignited. She and Rosaleen escape on an adventure where they are taken in by a trio of black beekeeping sisters. While Lily tries to unlock the secrets of her past, she and Rosaleen find solace in the mesmerizing world of bees and spirituality in this extraordinary tale of awakening, fellowship, and healing.

Prior to the world premiere, two-time Tony-nominee and Drama Desk-winning lyricist Susan Birkenhead (Jelly's Last Jam), two-time Pulitzer Prize-winning writer Lynn Nottage (Sweat), Tony- and Grammy Award-winning composer Duncan Sheik (Spring Awakening), and Tony-winning director Sam Gold (Fun Home) discuss their collaboration and creative process of turning Sue Monk Kidd's novel into a musical. Cast members will also perform highlights.

TICKETS & VENUE
$45, $40 Guggenheim Members and Friends of Works & Process
Box Office (212) 423-3575 or worksandprocess.org
Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
1071 Fifth Avenue, New York

Lead funding for Works & Process is provided by The Florence Gould Foundation, The Christian Humann Foundation, Mertz-Gilmore Foundation, Stavros Niarchos Foundation, Rockefeller Brothers Fund, and the Evelyn Sharp Foundation, with public funds from the National Endowment for the Arts and New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.

Works & Process at the Guggenheim 
Described by The New York Times as "an exceptional opportunity to understand something of the creative process," for over 34 years and in over 500 productions, New Yorkers have been able to see, hear, and meet the most acclaimed artists in the world, in an intimate setting unlike any other. Works & Process, the performing arts series at the Guggenheim, has championed new works and offered audiences unprecedented access to generations of leading creators and performers. Most performances take place in the Guggenheim's intimate Frank Lloyd Wright-designed 285-seat Peter B. Lewis Theater. In 2017, Works & Process established a new residency and commissioning program, inviting artists to create new works, made in and for the iconic Guggenheim rotunda. worksandprocess.org.

04/22/2019 07:30 PM
Mon, April 22
7:30PM
$
$25 - Adults
$18 - Seniors, Students
Children under 12: Free
Members: Free
Get Tickets

Costume and Dance Commission at the Guggenheim

Works & Process at the Guggenheim
Presents a Costume and Dance Commission
Reid Bartelme and Harriet Jung Design Dialogues
New Choreography by Christopher Williams and Netta Yerulshamy
in collaboration with
NYU's Institute for the Study of the Ancient World's
Hymn to Apollo: The Ancient World a... [ + ]nd the Ballets Russes
Sunday and Monday, April 28 and 29, 2019 at 7:30pm

Works & Process, the performing arts series at the Guggenheim, presents a Works & Process dance and costume commission by Reid Bartelme and Harriet Jung with new choreography by Christopher Williams and Netta Yerulshamy in collaboration with NYU's Institute for the Study of the Ancient World's exhibition, Hymn to Apollo: The Ancient World and the Ballets Russes, on Sunday and Monday, April 28 and 29, 2019 at 7:30pm

Inspired by Hymn to Apollo: The Ancient World and the Ballets Russes, the first exhibition to focus specifically on the role of ancient world and the Ballet Russes, costume designers Reid Bartelme and Harriet Jung will use original Ballets Russes costumes and designs as their point of departure for this Works & Process costume and dance commission featuring music excerpts from Maurice Ravel's Daphnis and Chloe. Interspersed between the performances, Linda Murray, curator of the Jerome Robbins Dance Division at the New York Public Library for the Performing Arts, will moderate the discussion.

Choreographer Netta Yerulshamy's abstract telling of Daphnis and Chloe will feature dancers Reid Bartelme, Brittany Engel Adams, Marc Crousillat, Harriet Jung, and Amos Machanic.

Choreographer Christopher William's literal telling of Daphnis and Chloe will feature Sara Mearns as Chloe (a shepherdess); I-Ling Liu as Bryaxis (a pirate captain); Christiana Axelsen, Marc Crousillat, Caitlin Scranton, and Carlo Antonio Villanueva as the pirates; Reid Bartelme, Maggie Cloud, and Casey Hess as nymphs; and Cemiyon Barber, Casey Hess, Logan Pedon, Victor Lozano, and Carlo Antonio Villanueva as creatures of Pan.

Hymn to Apollo: The Ancient World and the Ballets Russes
The Institute for the Study of the Ancient World (ISAW) continues to illuminate the rich dialogue between the ancient and the modern with Hymn to Apollo: The Ancient World and the Ballets Russes, an exhibition exploring the seminal role of antiquity in shaping the radically new creations of the famed ballet troupe founded in 1909 by Sergei Diaghilev. The first exhibition to examine this topic, Hymn to Apollo contains around 95 objects, including outstanding examples of ancient pottery, sculpture, metalwork, and more, coupled with costumes, photographs, watercolors, musical scores, digitized films of Ballets Russes productions, and a rich trove of archival material.

04/28/2019 07:30 PM
Sun, April 28
7:30PM
$
$25 - Adults
$18 - Seniors, Students
Children under 12: Free
Members: Free
Get Tickets
View All Upcoming Events

@guggenheim

Did you #GuessTheArtist correctly? Here’s the full view of #JoanMiró’s “Figure, Dog, Birds” (1946), from our collec…
https://t.co/pABRxvRi8g 17 Hours Ago

"Leigh’s unfaltering dedication to place black femininity at the center of her narrative has allowed a younger gene…
https://t.co/goTt5lRusi Yesterday at 3:11 PM

#GuessTheArtist—this artist’s first major museum retrospective was held at the @MuseumModernArt in 1941. Comment yo…
https://t.co/sQVglIeiyW Yesterday at 2:00 PM

Final weekend! Don't miss #HilmaAfKlint in the iconic Guggenheim rotunda through April 23. @robertasmithnyt revisit…
https://t.co/rq2GeWN7OV Yesterday at 2:00 PM

view all

Other Museums Attractions

Asia Society

Asia Society Museum presents acclaimed traditional, modern, and contemporary exh... view

National Museum of the American Indian

The National Museum of the American Indian is the sixteenth museum of the Smiths... view

Rubin Museum of Art

The Rubin Museum of Art (RMA) is a cultural and educational institution dedicate... view

Brooklyn Museum

The Brooklyn Museum is the second largest art museum in New York City and one of... view