Museum of Arts & Design (MAD)

2 Columbus Circle

The new Museum of Arts and Design at 2 Columbus Circle opened to the public in late September 2008. Located at the southwest corner of Central Park, where four subway lines and seven bus lines intersect, the Museum's new home is well-positioned to se... more

The new Museum of Arts and Design at 2 Columbus Circle opened to the public in late September 2008. Located at the southwest corner of Central Park, where four subway lines and seven bus lines intersect, the Museum's new home is well-positioned to serve over 500,000 visitors annually. The Museum at 2 Columbus Circle is a vibrant and engaging cultural center like no other institution in the city. Offering more than double the exhibition space of our current location, our new home will present a fully integrated visitor experience for our rapidly growing audiences. For the first time in its history, the Museum will have dedicated space for its permanent collection. The entire sixth floor will house our educational programs and three artist-in-residence studios, making the Museum the first multi-disciplinary institution to offer arts-in-education, hands-on art-making, and art making within the museum experience. While the redesign was roundly criticized in a number of circles, others found it an intriguing and fresh use of a complicated modernist space. The new Museum also has a 155-seat auditorium and a ninth floor restaurant with sweeping views of Central Park. The luminescen... more

The new Museum of Arts and Design at 2 Columbus Circle opened to the public in late September 2008. Located at the southwest corner of Central Park, where four subway lines and seven bus lines intersect, the Museum's new home is well-positioned to serve over 500,000 visitors annually.

The Museum at 2 Columbus Circle is a vibrant and engaging cultural center like no other institution in the city. Offering more than double the exhibition space of our current location, our new home will present a fully integrated visitor experience for our rapidly growing audiences. For the first time in its history, the Museum will have dedicated space for its permanent collection. The entire sixth floor will house our educational programs and three artist-in-residence studios, making the Museum the first multi-disciplinary institution to offer arts-in-education, hands-on art-making, and art making within the museum experience. While the redesign was roundly criticized in a number of circles, others found it an intriguing and fresh use of a complicated modernist space.

The new Museum also has a 155-seat auditorium and a ninth floor restaurant with sweeping views of Central Park. The luminescent ceramic exterior of the new building will symbolize the revitalization of an important urban space and underscore our dedication to materials and process.


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Info

2 Columbus Circle
New York, NY 10019
(212) 299-7777
Website

Editorial Rating

Admission And Tickets

$16 - Adults
$14 - Seniors
$12 - Students
Children under 12: Free
Members: Free

Pay what you wish on Thursday: 6pm-9pm

This Week's Hours

Tue - Sun: 10:00am-6:00pm

Thursdays open until 9pm. Pay what you wish after 6pm!

Closed Mondays, Tuesdays and major holidays

Nearby Subway

  • 2, 3, A, B, C, D, F to 59th Street / Columbus Circle

Upcoming Events

Permanently MAD: Revealing The Collection

Permanently MAD: Revealing the Collection presents approximately 250 works from the Museum of Arts and Design’s permanent collection. For the first time in the Museum’s 52-year history, dedicated collections galleries introduce visitors to the phenomenal ceramic, glass, wood, metal, fiber, and mixed... [ + ] media works in the Museum’s collections. Many of the pieces are on view for the first time.

Permanently MAD offers new ways of looking at artworks, outside of traditional hierarchies of art, craft, and design. Exhibition sections allow viewers to draw connections between works of all media, presenting fresh insights for those familiar with the Museum and for those visiting for the first time. In “Description: Seeing the Object,” viewers are encouraged to explore artworks visually, through the language of form, color, and surface patterning. In “Intention: The Artist Speaks,” each object reflects a specific world view, emotion, or imaginative viewpoint of the artist. Finally, “Reflection: Objects in Context” explores the ways in which the objects are influenced by the environment—physical, historical, or social–-in which they were created.

The artists in the show demonstrate a variety of backgrounds and disciplines. Sam Maloof is considered one of the leading figures of the Studio Craft Movement, helping to bring back an emphasis on hand-crafting wood furniture. His signature rocker is celebrated as a hallmark of classic design.

An emphasis on the handmade is also a concern for Harumi Nakashima and Myra Mimlitsch-Gray. Nakashima builds coiled domes and then cuts them open, to reveal the interiors and to manipulate the shapes. Mimlitsch-Gray integrates humor and irony in her teapot, by raising a sheet of pure silver with a hammer and anvil to echo the liquid appearance of melting metal.

Judith Schaechter’s stained glass offers a whimsical, fantastical look at a parade of creatures. She uses traditional stained-glass techniques, while relying on computer technology to help her sketch and design the composition. Ayala Serfaty's use of transparent glass filaments along with a polymer covering demonstrates cutting-edge technology and an innovative aesthetic.

The exhibition is accompanied by an illustrated, 250-page catalogue with 200 highlights from the collection. Organized alphabetically by artist, the catalogue includes beautiful new photography, as well as a curator’s statement for each object. The catalogue features a timeline of the Museum’s history, along with an index by material. It functions as a guidebook to the collection and to the Museum, both for casual readers and scholars.

Permanently MAD: Revealing the Collection is made possible, in part, through the generosity of the Collectors Circle, one of the Museum's leadership support groups.

11/20/2018 11:00 AM
Tue, November 20
11:00AM
$
$16 - Adults
$14 - Seniors
$12 - Students
Children under 12: Free
Members: Free

Pay what you wish on Thursday: 6pm-9pm

Permanently MAD: Revealing The Collection

Permanently MAD: Revealing the Collection presents approximately 250 works from the Museum of Arts and Design’s permanent collection. For the first time in the Museum’s 52-year history, dedicated collections galleries introduce visitors to the phenomenal ceramic, glass, wood, metal, fiber, and mixed... [ + ] media works in the Museum’s collections. Many of the pieces are on view for the first time.

Permanently MAD offers new ways of looking at artworks, outside of traditional hierarchies of art, craft, and design. Exhibition sections allow viewers to draw connections between works of all media, presenting fresh insights for those familiar with the Museum and for those visiting for the first time. In “Description: Seeing the Object,” viewers are encouraged to explore artworks visually, through the language of form, color, and surface patterning. In “Intention: The Artist Speaks,” each object reflects a specific world view, emotion, or imaginative viewpoint of the artist. Finally, “Reflection: Objects in Context” explores the ways in which the objects are influenced by the environment—physical, historical, or social–-in which they were created.

The artists in the show demonstrate a variety of backgrounds and disciplines. Sam Maloof is considered one of the leading figures of the Studio Craft Movement, helping to bring back an emphasis on hand-crafting wood furniture. His signature rocker is celebrated as a hallmark of classic design.

An emphasis on the handmade is also a concern for Harumi Nakashima and Myra Mimlitsch-Gray. Nakashima builds coiled domes and then cuts them open, to reveal the interiors and to manipulate the shapes. Mimlitsch-Gray integrates humor and irony in her teapot, by raising a sheet of pure silver with a hammer and anvil to echo the liquid appearance of melting metal.

Judith Schaechter’s stained glass offers a whimsical, fantastical look at a parade of creatures. She uses traditional stained-glass techniques, while relying on computer technology to help her sketch and design the composition. Ayala Serfaty's use of transparent glass filaments along with a polymer covering demonstrates cutting-edge technology and an innovative aesthetic.

The exhibition is accompanied by an illustrated, 250-page catalogue with 200 highlights from the collection. Organized alphabetically by artist, the catalogue includes beautiful new photography, as well as a curator’s statement for each object. The catalogue features a timeline of the Museum’s history, along with an index by material. It functions as a guidebook to the collection and to the Museum, both for casual readers and scholars.

Permanently MAD: Revealing the Collection is made possible, in part, through the generosity of the Collectors Circle, one of the Museum's leadership support groups.

11/21/2018 11:00 AM
Wed, November 21
11:00AM
$
$16 - Adults
$14 - Seniors
$12 - Students
Children under 12: Free
Members: Free

Pay what you wish on Thursday: 6pm-9pm

Permanently MAD: Revealing The Collection

Permanently MAD: Revealing the Collection presents approximately 250 works from the Museum of Arts and Design’s permanent collection. For the first time in the Museum’s 52-year history, dedicated collections galleries introduce visitors to the phenomenal ceramic, glass, wood, metal, fiber, and mixed... [ + ] media works in the Museum’s collections. Many of the pieces are on view for the first time.

Permanently MAD offers new ways of looking at artworks, outside of traditional hierarchies of art, craft, and design. Exhibition sections allow viewers to draw connections between works of all media, presenting fresh insights for those familiar with the Museum and for those visiting for the first time. In “Description: Seeing the Object,” viewers are encouraged to explore artworks visually, through the language of form, color, and surface patterning. In “Intention: The Artist Speaks,” each object reflects a specific world view, emotion, or imaginative viewpoint of the artist. Finally, “Reflection: Objects in Context” explores the ways in which the objects are influenced by the environment—physical, historical, or social–-in which they were created.

The artists in the show demonstrate a variety of backgrounds and disciplines. Sam Maloof is considered one of the leading figures of the Studio Craft Movement, helping to bring back an emphasis on hand-crafting wood furniture. His signature rocker is celebrated as a hallmark of classic design.

An emphasis on the handmade is also a concern for Harumi Nakashima and Myra Mimlitsch-Gray. Nakashima builds coiled domes and then cuts them open, to reveal the interiors and to manipulate the shapes. Mimlitsch-Gray integrates humor and irony in her teapot, by raising a sheet of pure silver with a hammer and anvil to echo the liquid appearance of melting metal.

Judith Schaechter’s stained glass offers a whimsical, fantastical look at a parade of creatures. She uses traditional stained-glass techniques, while relying on computer technology to help her sketch and design the composition. Ayala Serfaty's use of transparent glass filaments along with a polymer covering demonstrates cutting-edge technology and an innovative aesthetic.

The exhibition is accompanied by an illustrated, 250-page catalogue with 200 highlights from the collection. Organized alphabetically by artist, the catalogue includes beautiful new photography, as well as a curator’s statement for each object. The catalogue features a timeline of the Museum’s history, along with an index by material. It functions as a guidebook to the collection and to the Museum, both for casual readers and scholars.

Permanently MAD: Revealing the Collection is made possible, in part, through the generosity of the Collectors Circle, one of the Museum's leadership support groups.

11/22/2018 11:00 AM
Thu, November 22
11:00AM
$
$16 - Adults
$14 - Seniors
$12 - Students
Children under 12: Free
Members: Free

Pay what you wish on Thursday: 6pm-9pm

Permanently MAD: Revealing The Collection

Permanently MAD: Revealing the Collection presents approximately 250 works from the Museum of Arts and Design’s permanent collection. For the first time in the Museum’s 52-year history, dedicated collections galleries introduce visitors to the phenomenal ceramic, glass, wood, metal, fiber, and mixed... [ + ] media works in the Museum’s collections. Many of the pieces are on view for the first time.

Permanently MAD offers new ways of looking at artworks, outside of traditional hierarchies of art, craft, and design. Exhibition sections allow viewers to draw connections between works of all media, presenting fresh insights for those familiar with the Museum and for those visiting for the first time. In “Description: Seeing the Object,” viewers are encouraged to explore artworks visually, through the language of form, color, and surface patterning. In “Intention: The Artist Speaks,” each object reflects a specific world view, emotion, or imaginative viewpoint of the artist. Finally, “Reflection: Objects in Context” explores the ways in which the objects are influenced by the environment—physical, historical, or social–-in which they were created.

The artists in the show demonstrate a variety of backgrounds and disciplines. Sam Maloof is considered one of the leading figures of the Studio Craft Movement, helping to bring back an emphasis on hand-crafting wood furniture. His signature rocker is celebrated as a hallmark of classic design.

An emphasis on the handmade is also a concern for Harumi Nakashima and Myra Mimlitsch-Gray. Nakashima builds coiled domes and then cuts them open, to reveal the interiors and to manipulate the shapes. Mimlitsch-Gray integrates humor and irony in her teapot, by raising a sheet of pure silver with a hammer and anvil to echo the liquid appearance of melting metal.

Judith Schaechter’s stained glass offers a whimsical, fantastical look at a parade of creatures. She uses traditional stained-glass techniques, while relying on computer technology to help her sketch and design the composition. Ayala Serfaty's use of transparent glass filaments along with a polymer covering demonstrates cutting-edge technology and an innovative aesthetic.

The exhibition is accompanied by an illustrated, 250-page catalogue with 200 highlights from the collection. Organized alphabetically by artist, the catalogue includes beautiful new photography, as well as a curator’s statement for each object. The catalogue features a timeline of the Museum’s history, along with an index by material. It functions as a guidebook to the collection and to the Museum, both for casual readers and scholars.

Permanently MAD: Revealing the Collection is made possible, in part, through the generosity of the Collectors Circle, one of the Museum's leadership support groups.

11/23/2018 11:00 AM
Fri, November 23
11:00AM
$
$16 - Adults
$14 - Seniors
$12 - Students
Children under 12: Free
Members: Free

Pay what you wish on Thursday: 6pm-9pm
View All Upcoming Events

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