Carnegie Hall

881 Seventh Avenue

This world famous concert venue is a New York City landmark and must-see music attraction. Carnegie Hall presents classical, jazz, folk, world, and popular music with breakthrough and veteran performers. Since opening in 1891, this concert hall has b... more

This world famous concert venue is a New York City landmark and must-see music attraction. Carnegie Hall presents classical, jazz, folk, world, and popular music with breakthrough and veteran performers. Since opening in 1891, this concert hall has become the emblem of musical achievement around the world; and has showcased the world's finest artists—from Tchaikovsky to Mahler, Horowitz to Callas to Bernstein, even Judy Garland and the Beatles. Experience a concert, take the tour or visit the Rose Museum all at Carnegie Hall. Come share in the history of America's most famous concert hall! The three major halls housed in the complex are: Isaac Stern Auditorium The largest hall at Carnegie Hall, dedicated the Isaac Stern Auditorium in 1996, has been the premier classical music performance space in the United States since its opening in 1891, showcasing the world's greatest soloists, conductors, and ensembles. Throughout its century-plus history, it has also hosted important jazz events, historic lectures, noted educational forums, and much more. Designed by architect and cellist William Burnett Tuthill and renovated in 1986, the auditorium's striking curvilinear design allows... more

This world famous concert venue is a New York City landmark and must-see music attraction. Carnegie Hall presents classical, jazz, folk, world, and popular music with breakthrough and veteran performers. Since opening in 1891, this concert hall has become the emblem of musical achievement around the world; and has showcased the world's finest artists—from Tchaikovsky to Mahler, Horowitz to Callas to Bernstein, even Judy Garland and the Beatles. Experience a concert, take the tour or visit the Rose Museum all at Carnegie Hall. Come share in the history of America's most famous concert hall!

The three major halls housed in the complex are:

Isaac Stern Auditorium
The largest hall at Carnegie Hall, dedicated the Isaac Stern Auditorium in 1996, has been the premier classical music performance space in the United States since its opening in 1891, showcasing the world's greatest soloists, conductors, and ensembles. Throughout its century-plus history, it has also hosted important jazz events, historic lectures, noted educational forums, and much more. Designed by architect and cellist William Burnett Tuthill and renovated in 1986, the auditorium's striking curvilinear design allows the stage to become a focal point embraced by five levels of seating, which accommodates up to 2,804. The auditorium's renowned acoustics have made it a favorite of audiences and performers alike. "It has been said that the hall itself is an instrument," said the late Isaac Stern. "It takes what you do and makes it larger than life."

Joan and Sanford I. Weill Recital Hall
Located on the third floor of Carnegie Hall, the Joan and Sanford I. Weill Recital Hall is an intimate auditorium ideal for recitals, chamber music concerts, symposia, discussions, master classes, and more. Seating 268 people, the elegant auditorium evokes a Belle Epoque salon and is "remarkable for the symmetry of its proportions and the beauty of its decorations," according to a review from 1891, when the hall was known as the Chamber Music Hall. In 1986, the Chamber Music Hall was renamed in recognition of the generosity of the Chairman of the Board of Carnegie Hall, Sanford I. Weill, and his wife, Joan.

Judy and Arthur Zankel Hall
The Judy and Arthur Zankel Hall opened in September 2003 as the site of a broad spectrum of performing and educational events. When it first opened its doors In 1891, Carnegie Hall comprised three auditoriums: the Main Hall, the Chamber Music Hall, and the Recital Hall, located underneath the Main Hall. The Recital Hall was leased to the American Academy of Dramatic Arts in 1895 and was used as a theater by various groups until the early 1960s, when it was converted to a cinema. In 1997, a process began to reclaim the space for its original purpose, and construction began to create a versatile auditorium generally seating 599, with alternate stage configurations of different capacities. Zankel Hall is named in honor of the generosity of Carnegie Hall Vice Chairman Arthur Zankel and his wife, Judy.

History:
Somehow 57th Street between Fifth and Seventh Avenues has always managed to strike an urbane balance of activity, attractions, hotels and restaurants without the hustle or garish neon of the rest of Midtown. While the many art galleries have a magnetic draw on the sophisticated crowd during the day, Carnegie Hall has the intense pull in the evenings.

In the late nineteenth century, the wealthy steel magnate, Andrew Carnegie, was a member of the board of the Oratorio Society, whose German immigrant founder, Leopold Damrosch, desperately sought a benefactor for a large concert hall. After Leopold’s death, his son Walter convinced Carnegie to fund the venture; some years later, Damrosch’s dreams were realized when Carnegie Hall opened on May 5, 1891.

Numerous legendary titans of classical music of the past hundred years—including, Dvorák, Mahler, Prokofiev, Saint-Saëns, Strauss and Tchaikovsky—conducted and/or premiered their works at Carnegie Hall. Jazz greats such as Duke Ellington, Dizzy Gillespie, Benny Goodman, Count Basie and Billie Holiday peformed innumerable concerts here. Its larger-than-life conductors have included Leopold Stokowski, Arturo Toscanini and Leonard Bernstein.

The 1950s were a difficult period for Carnegie Hall; its location and very existence were called into question by the plans to construct nearby Lincoln Center. Demolition was fortunately prevented through the timely purchase of the Hall by the City of New York and the formation of the Carnegie Hall Corporation. The 1970s saw an increasing number of rock artists performing here, and major renovations were undertaken in the 1980s. Into the 1990s and beyond, Carnegie Hall continues every season to offer diverse and superior programming.

This area of 57th Street has several tourist draws in the food category that are perennial favorites, whether the simple yet polished Café Europa; the beloved, flamboyant Russian Tea Room; the loud and showy Hard Rock Café, complete with a cadillac jutting out from the façade; and a popular theme restaurant, the Jekyll & Hyde Club. Several boutique and larger hotels compete for the tourist crowd—little wonder the area is so popular!


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Midtown Description

Carnegie Hall is located in the Midtown neighborhood of Manhattan. Midtown West
From the hustle of the Port Authority Bus Terminal to the bustle of Seventh Avenue and 42nd Street, much of New York's dazzling vibrancy and energy emanates from this area stretching from Times Square to Central Park South. Packed with theaters, tourist attractions and tall office buildings, the buzz and glow of the city are most obvious amid the huge neon signs, giant wraparound news tickers (ABC News has a studio location here) and Broadway marquees. After braving the crowds of pop-obsessed teeny boppers gathered around MTV Studios visit the Hershey’s Time Square Store to satisfy your sweet tooth. Or grab a bite to eat at typical tourist meccas like TGI Friday's or the Dave & Buster's.

A stroll up Broadway, whether in the early morning or late at night, passes by some of America's most cherished institutions, and the number of glowing lights are rivaled only by the Las Vegas Strip. Little wonder that Mondrian's inspiration for "Broadway Boogie-Woogie" came from this amazing array of places and colors; some of the facades literally scream out at the visitor as though ready to burst out from the grid of Midtown's streets and fly into orbit!

If you need a respite from the sensory overstimulation of Times Square, visit the New York Public Library. The majestic Beaux-Arts building, flanked by the two famous marble lions, Patience and Fortitude, has been the heart and soul of the New York library system for nearly a century. It’s great for a little peace and quiet, and of course a great read. The library is to adjacent Bryant Park, which is a lovely patch of green in the middle of skyscraper territory. Among the amenities available to visitors are a French-style carousel, a boule board, chess tables, free summer movie screening, over 25,000 varieties of flowers, the Bryant Park Grill, and free wireless access, as well as 2,000 moveable chairs.

Midtown West is also home to Radio City Music Hall (home to world-famous dancers, the Rockettes), Museum of Television and Radio, Museum of Modern Art, Carnegie Hall and the newly renovated Museum of Arts & Design. These extraordinary cultural institutions play host year-round to natives and tourists alike, so catch an eye-catching exhibit or enjoy a symphony and bask in some of New York’s greatest artistic offerings.

There's also no shortage of restaurants in the area. For some excellent French fare try La Bergamote, which is known for its vast menu, with nearly 30 types of luxurious French pastries, six sorts of croissants, over a dozen types of breads as well as diverse handmade chocolates. For dinner try Aquavit, the country's preeminent Scandinavian restaurant. There really are too many dining options to list, but click here to check out entire listings of restaurant in the Midtown area.

If you're looking to spend your stay in New York right in the heart of Midtown, there are plenty of hotel options. The DoubleTree by Hilton is located right in Times Square, as is the sophisticated Park Central New York. And for the more budget conscious traveler there's the Comfort Inn Midtown and the Portland Square Hotel.

Midtown East
Midtown East stretches from 42nd Street north to 59th, and East of Fifth Avenue to the East River. The area is populated with some of New York’s most iconic landmarks. While walking along 42nd Street and Park Avenue a visit to Grand Central Station is certainly in order, for Grand Central is one of the most stunning railroad stations in America. Walk in to admire its stunning brass clock, the exquisite staircases, and the unique celestial ceiling, its light bluish-green background filled with well-known constellations dotted with tiny lights. Restored in recent years, the cavernous main hall is bathed in natural light during the day, and pulsates with activity at night, thanks not least to its three busy restaurants: Michael Jordan's Steakhouse, Metrazur, and the famous Oyster Bar. Another superb restaurant in the area includes the Benjamin Steakhouse, housed inside the ornate 1903 Beaux-Arts Dylan Hotel. There's also Sparks Steak House which is known for not only its massive steaks, but its massive wine list as well.

The gorgeous Chrysler Building (which turned 75 in 2005) is also nearby. In the bright sunlight, the upper floors gleam, reflect, and even seem to pulsate light, directing the eye upwards towards the spire. Its gorgeous Art Deco lobby, with murals celebrating transportation themes, is definitely one of New York’s finest. Examine the ornamental details, the typical Deco motifs, the lush marble, and the charming light fixtures, all restored in recent years. You’ll also definitely want to visit Rockefeller Center. The plaza, adorned with Paul Manship’s massive golden 1934 statue of Prometheus contains the world-famous ice skating rink and of course is home to the giant Christmas tree every December, making it a must-see holiday destination. While you’re in the neighborhood take a tour of the United Nations and get a behind-the scenes look at the diplomacy in action at the global meeting place of the General Assembly and Security Council.

Midtown East is also home to some of the world's most well known department stores, including Lord & Taylor, Bergdorf Goodman and of course the original Saks Fifth Avenue. All those retailers have an extraordinary selection of upscale goods and are considered classic, can’t-go-wrong stops for any shopaholic. So take your time strolling through this quintessential region of Manhattan - explore those famous landmarks, have a stop for lunch, and then proceed to do a little upscale shopping.

Midtown East is an ideal neighborhood to spend your stay in New York, as the area is full of attractions and iconic landmarks. The beautiful, Art Deco styled Roosevelt Hotel is just four blocks from the Rockefeller Center and Radio City Music Hall and within walking distance of Times Square and Museum of Modern Art. There's also the Grand Hyatt, which is located right near the United Nations and St. Patrick's Cathedral. The spacious and elegant Dylan Hotel, as well as the W New York – The Tuscany are other exceptional options. Click here for a complete list of hotels in close proximity to Midtown East.

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881 Seventh Avenue
New York, NY 10019
(212) 247-7800
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Upcoming Events

Symphony of Carols

This program features holiday music from composer Randol Bass conducted by DCINY Artistic Director and Co-Founder Maestro Jonathan Griffith. The evening will also include the World Premiere of Christmas Presence conducted by the composer, Pepper Choplin. This concert features the Distinguished Conce... [ + ]rts Singers and Orchestra.

Performers:
Pepper Choplin, Conductor
Jonathan Griffith, Conductor
Distinguished Concerts Orchestra and Distinguished Concerts Singers International

Program:
Choplin: Christmas Presence (World Premiere)
Choplin: Come, Emmanuel!
Bass: Victorian Christmas Suite (World Premiere)
Bass: Laus Nativitatis (World Premiere)
Bass: Symphony of Carols
Bass: Gloria

Tickets $20-$100!
On Sale Now!
Visit CarnegieHall.org or call 212-247-7800
Box Office: 57th Street and Seventh Avenue

11/18/2018 08:30 PM
Sun, November 18
8:30PM
$
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Messiah…Refreshed!

DCINY celebrates the holiday season with the eighth annual presentation of Handel’s Messiah, the Beecham/Goossens 1959 re-orchestration for full symphony orchestra. The performance is led by Maestro Jonathan Griffith, featuring an international choir made up of singers from all over the world.

Pe... [ + ]rformers:
Jonathan Griffith, Conductor
Penelope Shumate, Soprano
Claudia Chapa, Mezzo-Soprano
John McVeigh, Tenor
Christopher Job, Baritone
Distinguished Concerts Orchestra and Distinguished Concerts Singers International

Program:
Handel: Messiah (arr. Goossens)

Tickets $20-$100!
On Sale Now!
Visit CarnegieHall.org or call 212-247-7800
Box Office: 57th Street and Seventh Avenue

11/25/2018 02:00 PM
Sun, November 25
2:00PM
$
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A Winter Rose

American composers/conductors Joseph Martin and Mark Hayes bring their original choral music to Carnegie Hall to celebrate the holidays. This performance features the Distinguished Concerts Singers and Orchestra.

Performers:
Mark Hayes, Conductor
Joseph M. Martin, Conductor
Andrea Lynn Cianfl... [ + ]ones, Soprano
Distinguished Concerts Orchestra and Distinguished Concerts Singers International

Program:
Martin: The Winter Rose (NY Premiere)
Hayes: Hodie Christus Natus Est, A Carol Fantasia (World Premiere)
Hayes: Gloria

Tickets $20-$100!
On Sale Now!
Visit CarnegieHall.org or call 212-247-7800
Box Office: 57th Street and Seventh Avenue

11/26/2018 07:00 PM
Mon, November 26
7:00PM
$
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Ode to Joy: Beethoven’s Symphony No. 9 and Choral Fantasy

In culmination of DCINY’s Tenth Anniversary Season, Maestro Jonathan Griffith conducts the Distinguished Concerts Singers and Orchestra in Beethoven's Symphony No. 9 and Choral Fantasy. The concert will feature performers from all over the globe.

Performers:
Jonathan Griffith, Conductor
Warren ... [ + ]Lee, Piano
Danielle Talamantes, Soprano
Claudia Chapa, Mezzo-Soprano
John McVeigh, Tenor
Christopher Job, Baritone
Distinguished Concerts Orchestra and Distinguished Concerts Singers International

Program:
ALL-BEETHOVEN PROGRAM
Symphony No. 9
Choral Fantasy

Tickets $20-$100!
On Sale Now!
Visit CarnegieHall.org or call 212-247-7800
Box Office: 57th Street and Seventh Avenue

12/03/2018 07:00 PM
Mon, December 03
7:00PM
$
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@carnegiehall

We remember the life of Stan Lee, who appeared on the Carnegie Hall stage in 1972 headlining “A Marvel-ous Evening…
https://t.co/IaAPOOXNSQ 11 Hours Ago

RT @chstudenttix: $10 student tix | November 13 at 8 PM | @nezetseguin leads @PhilOrch, with mezzo-soprano @JoyceDiDonato | Works by Wagner… Yesterday at 12:38 AM

RT @nycgov: End of day on 57th Street and @carnegiehall. #CityOfArts
https://t.co/RO8uyZTslI Yesterday at 10:17 PM

RT @WQXR: Amazing to watch: Cellist Yo-Yo Ma performs during Armistice ceremony at Arc de Triomphe
https://t.co/dVYzTkw8lg via @YouTube Yesterday at 10:12 PM

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